Yale Study Underscores Health Benefits of Walnuts.  But TCM Already Knew That!

December, 2015. Reuters Health recently reported that a recent study at the Yale University Prevention Research Center in Derby, Connecticut showed that eating a handful of walnuts each day may be particularly good for people at risk of developing diabetes. When study subjects added 56 grams of walnuts (2 ounces, or about 14 walnuts) to their daily diet for six months, they had improvements in blood vessel function and reductions in LDL cholesterol.

Walnuts - HealthPoint Oriental Medicine, Bloomington MN


December, 2015. Reuters Health recently reported that a recent study at the Yale University Prevention Research Center in Derby, Connecticut showed that eating a handful of walnuts each day may be particularly good for people at risk of developing diabetes. When study subjects added 56 grams of walnuts (2 ounces, or about 14 walnuts) to their daily diet for six months, they had improvements in blood vessel function and reductions in LDL cholesterol.

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) classifies walnuts (Hu Tao Ren - 胡桃仁 - Semen Juglandis Regiae) as a yang supplement. Walnut is sweet and warm to supplement the kidneys, warm the lungs, and moisten the intestines to relieve vacuity patterns.

Clinically, your acupuncturist might add walnuts to your TCM herbal formula (or he might suggest that you simply add walnuts to your diet) if your TCM pattern includes symptoms of low back and knee soreness, urinary frequency or incontinence, chronic cough and wheezing (asthma), and and/constipation. Such symptoms are more common among, but not exclusive to, the elderly.
Getting back to the Yale study, after taking into account factors such as age, exercise habits, calorie consumption and fatty acid intake, it was concluded that walnuts were linked to improved diet quality regardless of whether people received nutrition counseling.

By the way, applying the law of similars would suggest that walnuts are good for brain health (i.e., they look a little like the brain organ). And according to the Pauling Institute, the phospholipids of the brain’s gray matter contain high proportions of DHA and AA (docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid, respectively, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids), suggesting they are important to central nervous system function.


Note that this study represents a small sample size and it had other design limitations. Also, the California Walnut Commission funded the study and has compensated the lead author for speaking engagements. Still, there is previous research linking consumption of walnuts to improved markers of heart health and lower risks of diabetes and heart disease, as well as thousands of years of empirical benefit with respect to the aforementioned uses in traditional Chinese medicine.

Questions about traditional Chinese medicine dietary therapy?  Call HealthPoint at 952-767-4910.



[IMAGE]
Self-managed web sites powered by iEditWeb, Inc.